interview

In Orbit With... Leda Nasio

TMU: Tell us about the influence of the Hispanic market in US ad culture.

LN: We’ve been part of this market for at least forty years. The improvement has been remarkable. These days we often win awards at Cannes and others major advertising festivals. Hispanic creative directors – or second generation Hispanics have top positions in the US general market. Many of the best Hispanic creatives are from Argentina who moved to the US and bring that witty, think-out-of-the-box mentality who stand out from the crowd.

TMU: How do ads targeted at US Hispanics differ from US mainstream?
   

LN: The way young people communicate with each other, regardless of the language and culture has become similar around the world.  The new technologies and social networks created a kind of universal code, understood in Japan, London or Austin, Texas. However, there are still some constant values in our culture: family, friendship, music, sense of humour, and the pride of being part of a caring community.

TMU: Do you think ads created specifically for the US Hispanic market are more effective than those that are adapted? 

LN: Definitely. For reasons explained in the previous answer. 

TMU: Have recent political events rocked the boat in this sector?

LN: Yes they definitely have. We’re living a political moment in a time where everything changes really fast, in a highly unpredictable way. This new reality is hitting hard on the Hispanic population all across the country.  These events create confusion and uncertainty in our sector – we’ll see how it unfolds.

TMU: What’s the impact of Spanish-speaking TVC and Film Directors in the US? 

LN: Big names, famous worldwide, like Alfonso Cuarón, Emmanuel Lubezki, Rodrigo Prieto or González Iñarritu started, and some of them still are, shooting commercials for our market.  And more fresh talent is waiting for their breakthrough. 

TMU: How do you see your relationship with an advertising agency – are you just a service provider or a strategic, creative partner? 

LN: We love to feel we’re strategic and creative partners. The truth is: it depends on each agency and client. Sometimes we’re able to participate more actively on the process and sometimes we just film an almost untouchable storyboard. I believe the results are better and the projects are more rewarding when we can be more than just a service provider. 

TMU: Name two TV commercials that have knocked your socks off lately.

LN: Brothers” for HP by Seb Edwards

“Go Further” by Ford 

TMU: What do you look for when hiring a Director?

LN: An original vision and commitment. 

TMU: What makes a great Director?

LN: Uniqueness. 

TMU: Why aren’t there more female Directors out there?

LN: I want to believe it’s just a matter of time to see similar number of female and male directors. It’s already happening, especially in TV Series. 

TMU: What has to happen to get more gender equality in this industry? 

LN: Try harder. Keep at it, never stop. 

TMU: What’s the best place for lunch in LA right now? 

LN: G’Justa in Venice Beach is one of my favorites right now. It’s the same owner as the popular Gjelina restaurant on Abbot Kinney. It’s a hidden gem, literally hidden on a small side street, with no storefront name. Once you enter it’s totally unexpected and you’re transported. There’s a wonderful display of incredibly tasty foods that you order directly at the counter. Yum!

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